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20121009
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found it quite shocking to see governor romney in a speech with edelson in the front row taking a position about the middle east that, to say the least, will box him in in a way that presidents don't usually want to be boxed in on foreign policy. it was a rather tight commitment that mitt romney made with a donor nodding in the front row. i was troubled by that as if he makes a commitment to end investigations against edelson. i had an argument with mine, is he more interested in destroying unions or supporting, you know, he has other priorities as well. i don't think it matters. i don't think the rules have to be that clear. the rules are you want to create a structure where elected officials are not wholly dependent on a given -- not largely dependent on a given donor. one of the principles i always use is you want them to be in a situation where if they're in office and that donor comes back and says i really want x, y, z, the elected official can say, as senator mccain famously did, get out of my office. and if you can't because that money is fundamentally important to your
like if your argument is money is free speech, then we should hold people accountable for what they say. if the ceo of pepsi were to give $1 million to mitt romney tomorrow, i wouldn't buy pepsi for the rest of the year. so how are you going to hold it accountable? >> just one year? [laughter] >> he's not that committed. you've got to work on it. >> other pepsi products might be okay. just pepsi itself. >> not in new york city if they're really large. >> but what i'm saying is how can we hold these people accountable when we do not know what they are saying? >> long story short, this election cycle, there are a lot of different groups that organize differently under tax laws. the super pacs and independent expenditure 527 committees in all of those reported in the seat and reportedly monthly or quarterly and disclose their donors. they are also nonprofit organizations, a whole host of them, that organize under to the parts of the tax code, organized as 501(c)(4), and issue advocacy organization. they are private organizations that are not required to disclose their members or donors. th
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2

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